My Photos — on display for the benefit of the world

Latest

Gulf Coast Thunderstorms

 (DavidRaboin)

We can see the storm clouds ahead on the horizon from halfway across Texas. These are my first thunderstorms of the year. The rough weather is stacked up along the Gulf Coast. We’re flying east, LAX to Fort Lauderdale, and the late afternoon sun is dropping behind us.

 (DavidRaboin)

All the way across the Gulf of Mexico we dodge the growing clouds.

 (DavidRaboin)

The highest clouds glow in the late evening light.

 (DavidRaboin)

It’s night by the time we reach the western shore of Florida. A bolt of lightning arcs between storm clouds.

*All content created by David Raboin. Follow me on Facebook and Instagram. Order prints of the photos featured on this blog by clicking on the image or visit our website at photos4u2c.com Support this site by using one of my links to Amazon.com. Thanks!

Spring in Portland, Oregon

 (DavidRaboin)

I took a long walk in Portland. The trees were budding and blossoming. So far, I’m loving my new Canon 24-70 f2.8 L II. After this long walk, my wrist wasn’t achy at all like it would’ve been with my old 24-70 version 1.

 (DavidRaboin)

*All content created by David Raboin. Follow me on Facebook and Instagram. Order prints of the photos featured on this blog by clicking on the image or visit our website at photos4u2c.com Support this site by using one of my links to Amazon.com. Thanks!

Shadows and Desolation

 (DavidRaboin)

Long shadows reach across a forgotten valley in East Central Nevada

I gaze down from the flightdeck on a barren mountain range that looks like a cracked jawbone left to bleach on the desert floor. It makes me happy knowing that The Great Basin is out there quietly waiting, ready to cover my tracks with dust and swallow me whole. That highway, the one you see in the cut in the mountains, it’s always an option.

 (DavidRaboin)

Alpine glow at sundown on the desert peaks of Western Utah

*All content created by David Raboin. Follow me on Facebook and Instagram. Order prints of the photos featured on this blog by clicking on the image or visit our website at photos4u2c.com Support this site by using one of my links to Amazon.com. Thanks!

Trying out my New Lens in Boston

 (DavidRaboin)

The skate park at Boston’s North Point Park

I feel like the luckiest guy in the world. For our anniversary last week, Maria surprised me with a new Canon 24-70 f2.8 L II. According to the lens review sites, the 24-70 II is one of the finest optics ever manufactured. It’s reported to be as sharp as a high quality prime lens at all of its focal lengths. I can’t wait to get to know it better.

Since September 2007, I shot primarily with the original Canon 24-70 f2.8 L. I estimate that 85% of the photos posted on this blog were taken with my old 24-70. I always liked that lens, but never loved it. It was sharp, not crispy like my primes, but good enough. I could’ve whined about the old 24-70’s size, but I’m a big guy, and I don’t mind suffering a little for my art. I was totally happy with the results of that old lens, and was only moderately interested in it’s replacement, until I got my Canon 16-35 f4 L for Christmas 2014. The 16-35 was my first new L lens in many years and I was amazed at how much better the pictures looked coming from a more modern lens. The new lens had better contrast, better colors, better sharpness edge to edge, and it handled flare brilliantly.  Suddenly I found myself reading reviews of the 24-70 f2.8 L II. Could the new zoom live up to the hype? Was it worth the extreme price? I started saving my iStock pennies. I had to have the II. But life got in the way and I spent my stock photo horde several times. It seemed like I would never accumulate enough money for Canon’s ultimate lens.

 (DavidRaboin)

Busy Saturday Evening in Boston’s North Point

I’ve only had the new lens for a week now and I was sick in bed with the flu for three of those days, so other than a short photo-walk in Boston and a trip to the park with Holden, I haven’t had a chance to thoroughly test it out. My initial impression is positive. The 24-70 II focuses faster than the old version. More specifically, the focus motor feels like it packs more horsepower than an average lens. When the II focuses, it feels like a fat perch grabbing your line. It really tugs. I’ve also already noticed that this lens is extremely sharp. I haven’t had the opportunity to try it in interesting light, but the images I’ve taken with it so far all look very prime-like. The details really pop out. And you have to love evolution, even with these performance enhancements, the new lens is much lighter than the old version and it feels better on the camera. Maybe someday I’ll write a longer review, but probably not. I enjoy taking pictures and writing about images more than writing a lens review. I can’t wait to take this lens out again.

 

*All content created by David Raboin. Follow me on Facebook and Instagram. Order prints of the photos featured on this blog by clicking on the image or visit our website at photos4u2c.com Support this site by using one of my links to Amazon.com. Thanks!

Spring on Mount Diablo

 (DavidRaboin)

Northern Slopes of Mount Diablo with a rain shower in the distance

Between rain storms, I got up on Mount Diablo with my camera. This year it’s very green and the wildflowers are starting to blossom.

 (DavidRaboin)

Diablo in spring: Oak Tree, receding rain clouds and poppy blossoms

These photos were taken five days ago. When I was up there, poppies were budding everywhere. I image the mountainside will turn orange with flowers sometime this week or next. I want to get back up there for the bloom but now I am sick in bed with the flu, the worst flu I’ve ever had.

 (DavidRaboin)

Perched above the summit road

 (DavidRaboin)

Rock formation at sundown, and the first wisps of the next storm system stream across the sky 

*All content created by David Raboin. Follow me on Facebook and Instagram. Order prints of the photos featured on this blog by clicking on the image or visit our website at photos4u2c.com Support this site by using one of my links to Amazon.com. Thanks!
Support this site by using our links to Amazon